The first Latin American regional pipeline: From Mexico to Central America

The gas pipeline project that means to connect Mexico to Central America has been in development for some time, and it wasn’t until today that it finally saw the light! The construction of the pipeline is scheduled to kick off in 2016, and start operating by the year 2019.

By Notimex Tuesday, November 10, 2015 comments

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An Ambitious gas pipeline that provides important benefits

 

The gas pipeline project that means to connect Mexico to Central America has been in development for some time, and it wasn’t until today that it finally saw the light! The construction of the pipeline is scheduled to kick off in 2016, and start operating by the year 2019. This is the first Latin American regional pipeline that will connect Mexico and Central America, a project that sees nothing but excellent benefits.

 

This pipeline is intended to transport natural gas and allow its exports to Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, which will benefit these countries’ job openings, boost the industries themselves, and empower their energy sector, which at the same time will provide economic benefit for the governments and people.

 

Natural gas pipeline

Original Image: “Natural gas pipeline USA” by Bilfinger SE, used under CC BY-ND 2.0 license, via Flickr.

 

Besides such benefits, “the availability of natural gas in Central America would avoid emissions (particulate matter, SOx, NOx, HC, CO and CO2), including the dangers of greenhouse gas (GHG) that are causing climate change” expressed Hugo Beteta, Director of Subregional Headquarters in Mexico of ECLAC, quoted on an article from Forbes.

 

By doing this, the Central America’s Northern Triangle countries will be able to depend less on electric energy provided by fossil fuels and have a cleaner electric consumption and production, as well as reducing electric bills costs in industries, in the service sector and homes.

 

In order to get this done, the Central America’s Northern Triangle countries faces two challenges according to the ECLAC specialist: First is the development of a modern regional legislation that will encourage the regional investments in pipelines, reception terminals and electric plants. The second challenge is the scheme that will allow the making of a multinational company that will join the forces and investment of the countries involved in the development of the first Latin American regional pipeline.