Puebla underground tunnels are no longer an urban myth

A few days ago authorities of the state of Puebla announced the discovery of underground tunnels between 300 and 500 years old.

By Valeria Bigurra Friday, September 4, 2015 comments

 

A few days ago authorities of the state of Puebla announced the discovery of underground tunnels between 300 and 500 years old.

 

According to an article published by Mexican daily El Universal, these tunnels were found to be military structures that were used during the Battle of May 5, when Mexican troops faced the French army. The tunnels are 7 meters high by 3 meters wide, and the network is at least 10 kilometers long.

 

Tunel PueblaTúnel inundado” by Roberto Lumbreras – originally posted to Flickr as Túnel inundado. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons

 

Puebla’s underground tunnels had been an urban myth for a long time, but now their existence has finally been confirmed. “In the urban narrative or urban legends there was word of the tunnels in Puebla, but nobody knew where they were, they had never been seen”, said the manager of Cultural Heritage and Historical Center of Puebla, Sergio Vergara Bermejo, during an interview with El Universal.

 

The discovery of the tunnels was made thanks to various public works that are being carried out in the state capital. Four entrances were found filled with earth. The tunnels were located in the inner zone of the historic center and on the fringe of “Los Fuertes”, ancient chapels built on top of the Acueyametepec hill, which were converted into military fortifications in the nineteenth century.

 

Thanks to the construction, a line of tunnels running from Fort Loreto to the Fort of Guadalupe in the upper part of town, and from Fort Loreto to the District of San Jose, located in the center of the city, was discovered. Similarly there was one found that goes from the Fort of Guadalupe to Los Remedios Church.

 

The mayor of Puebla, Tony Gali, has ordered the rehabilitation of the tunnels for which he has earmarked 5 million pesos (about U.S. $295,593).

 

Puebla is a state with 2,600 buildings listed as historic and was listed as a World Heritage site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

 

This project seeks to rescue some of the treasures that Puebla has in its interior, while creating new tourist attractions that will make visitors learn a little more about the history and legends of this beautiful state.

 

Currently the exact location of the tunnels has not been revealed for safety reasons.

 

A few days ago authorities of the state of Puebla announced the discovery of underground tunnels between 300 and 500 years old.

 

According to an article published by Mexican daily El Universal, these tunnels were found to be military structures that were used during the Battle of May 5, when Mexican troops faced the French army. The tunnels are 7 meters high by 3 meters wide, and the network is at least 10 kilometers long.

 

Tunel Puebla“Túnel inundado” by Roberto Lumbreras – originally posted to Flickr as Túnel inundado. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons

 

 

Puebla’s underground tunnels had been an urban myth for a long time, but now their existence has finally been confirmed. “In the urban narrative or urban legends there was word of the tunnels in Puebla, but nobody knew where they were, they had never been seen”, said the manager of Cultural Heritage and Historical Center of Puebla, Sergio Vergara Bermejo, during an interview with El Universal.

 

The discovery of the tunnels was made thanks to various public works that are being carried out in the state capital. Four entrances were found filled with earth. The tunnels were located in the inner zone of the historic center and on the fringe of “Los Fuertes”, ancient chapels built on top of the Acueyametepec hill, which were converted into military fortifications in the nineteenth century.

 

Thanks to the construction, a line of tunnels running from Fort Loreto to the Fort of Guadalupe in the upper part of town, and from Fort Loreto to the District of San Jose, located in the center of the city, was discovered. Similarly there was one found that goes from the Fort of Guadalupe to Los Remedios Church.

 

The mayor of Puebla, Tony Gali, has ordered the rehabilitation of the tunnels for which he has earmarked 5 million pesos (about U.S. $295,593).

 

Puebla is a state with 2,600 buildings listed as historic and was listed as a World Heritage site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

 

This project seeks to rescue some of the treasures that Puebla has in its interior, while creating new tourist attractions that will make visitors learn a little more about the history and legends of this beautiful state.

 

Currently the exact location of the tunnels has not been revealed for safety reasons.

1.       “Túnel inundado” by Roberto Lumbreras – originally posted to Flickr as Túnel inundado. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Commons