Women sustain half of Mexico’s economy but earn crippling wages

Despite the fact that women represent 51.4% of the population, the State still considers them as a minority or “vulnerable group”.

By Notimex Monday, June 18, 2018 comments

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Despite the fact that women represent 51.4% of the population, the State still considers them as a minority or “vulnerable group”.

 

As part of the #DigitalAmbassadors program, consultancy firm Accenture Mexico invited the Mexican ambassador in India, Melba Pría, to give a teleconference from the company’s offices in New Delhi, to talk about the inclusion of women in paid work.

 

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“Women sustain half of the world’s economy,” said the ambassador, referring to the potential economic growth of countries, particularly Mexico.

 

According to the OECD, women in Mexico face one of the highest burdens of domestic work, undertaking about 80% of unpaid domestic tasks such as cooking, cleaning and family care, care of children, elderly or disabled.

 

Moreover, the research study “Getting to Equal 2018”, conducted by Accenture Mexico, reveals that for every 258 dollars that a man earns in the world, women earn only 100 dollars for the same activity, that is, less than 50%.

 

This is because Mexican women devote twice as much time to domestic work and home care, with 28.8 hours a week on average, while men only 12.4 hours.

 

The diplomat, currently ambassador of Mexico in five different countries: India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives, explained that as a result of this, Mexico is losing, in addition to half of its workforce, about 24.2% of the Product Gross Domestic Labour (GDP) in unpaid work, the equivalent of a quarter of national economic production.

 

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Commenting on these statements, the Director General for Accenture Mexico, Juan Sadurni, added that to encourage the gender gap to close, Mexican companies need to work on programs that facilitate the leadership and participation of women in the boards of directors; external communication and among collaborators; and the implementation of a paternity leave, with the aim of sharing responsibilities and benefits equally.