Easing Travelers Entry into Mexico

By Dania Vargas Austryjak

Avoid long lines and saving time.

When traveling, one of the most frustrating moments is when one has to wait in long lines to go through immigration. Now, Mexican airports have quick entry kiosks to help travelers through this time-consuming process in a very simple way.

The Mexican government, through its National Immigration Institute (INM) offers the Trusted Traveler Program (Programa Viajero Confiable), a simple process that eases the entry of citizens of Mexico and citizens of the United States who may be members of the Global Entry program. It consists of passing through automated kiosks in a matter of minutes, instead of waiting in long lines.

How does it work?

First off, if you are a U.S. citizen you need to hold membership in the Global Entry program in order to be eligible for the Mexican program. Candidates must fill out an online form, complete payment with a credit card and program an interview date (at least 15 days after date of application submission).

travel news Entry Mexico

The next step is to complete the interview process, where an immigrant officer takes biometrics, a photo and check all the information and documentation. If the application is approved, a membership for 5 years is granted.

At the airport, travelers must locate kiosks, scan their passport, fingerprints and fill in the immigration form and then you are ready to go. Currently the kiosks are located within the following airports: Mexico City International Airport, Cancun international Airport and San Jose del Cabo International Airport. The program is expected to open in other Mexican airports soon.

Programa Viajero Confiable is a simple and secure way to access the country, with no waiting lines and no time wasted. Ideal for those who constantly travel from and to Mexico.

If you’d like to apply or learn more information on the program, click on the following link:

http://www.viajeroconfiable.inm.gob.mx/index.php/home/

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