Mexico and Japan Unite to Improve Heart Surgery Techniques

By Dania Vargas Austryjak

Mexican surgeons learning from Japanese.

In order to improve heart surgeries, Mexico and Japan have signed an agreement to establish a training center for Mexican cardiologist to learn minimally invasive surgery techniques. The hope is that this effort will translate into a safer procedure, a shorter recovery time for the patient and less scarring and pain.

Mexico and Japan have agreed to collaborate on the “project of generalization of minimally invasive techniques” with the establishment of a training and education center within the facilities of "Ignacio Chavez" National Institute of Cardiology in Mexico City.

The center will be supplied with state of the art equipment donated by the Japanese government, tools that will help train Mexican surgeons in minimally invasive techniques applied to therapies of angioplasty and coronary intervention.

mexico japan surgery

Original Image: “A Navy officer performs surgery on an Indonesian patient in an operating room aboard USNS Mercy” by Official U.S. Navy Page, used under CC BY 2.0, via Flickr.

Starting next year, Japanese experts will begin teaching several activities, including: technical and theoretical preparation, as well as practice on high tech simulation models as well as live models such as animals and even human beings.

In a communiqué, the general director of Quality of Health Education, a subdivision of Mexico’s Ministry of Health,Sebastián García Saisó, stated that this binational effort will be a reference point in heart surgery for the rest of Latin America.

The agreement was signed by Dr. Sebastián García Saisó, Dr. Martha Navarro Albo from the Mexican Secretary of Foreign Relations, and Kazuyoshi Shinoyana, the Mexico representative of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

Scope

Original Image: “Scope” by JD Lasica, used under CC BY-NC 2.0, via Flickr.

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