Mexico City will implement new transit rules

By Valeria Bigurra Peñavera

In a place as large as Mexico City, people are often in a hurry, seeking to reach their homes or their jobs, over long distances, hoping to avoid the traffic.

However, in their hurry, many people do not moderate their speed when driving. Because of this the government of Mexico City, headed by Miguel Angel Mancera, decided to implement new traffic rules in order to reduce the number of road accidents that are reported annually in this huge city.

One of the new rules to be implemented under the new transit regulation is the reduction of the speed limit from 70 to 50 km/h on main roads, and a maximum of 80 km/h on roads with controlled access.

Also, public transportation drivers will be punished for taking and/or dropping off riders at unauthorized locations. Freight transport should take precautions for cyclists by placing sidebars.

The fines for not respecting signs; using the phone while driving; or sporting publicity will be higher. Seatbelts for all passengers will become mandatory.

transit rules

Source: Flickr. Original Title: “Mexican National Cathedral - La Catedral Nacional de México” by Daniel Ronan. Attribution 2.0 Generic License. 2004

24,000 deaths a year are reported in Mexico because of road accidents, of which 1,200 take place in the Mexican capital. This puts Mexico in 7th place in the world for traffic-related deaths.

"We start from a reverse pyramid according to what was seen in the above provisions,” said Mancera regarding these new guidelines. “The regulation being presented has this vision in which the city has to rethink and turn to pedestrians."

This new regulation will enter into force in January 2016, a period which was stipulated to place the needed road signs, as well as to train the members of the city’s Public and Traffic Safety division. It will also help the city’s inhabitants get familiarized with these new rules.

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