University of Arizona signs agreement with Mexico

By Valeria Bigurra Peñavera

The University of Arizona (UA) announced the signing of an agreement with the National Association of Polytechnic Universities (ANUP) of Mexico, with the objective of taking more Mexicans to study or research in Tucson.

Mike Proctor, VP of global initiatives of the UA, said that with this agreement they managed to advance their status as an institutional partner, fully reliable and supportive of higher education in Mexico.

This agreement is aimed to motivate students from rural areas of Mexico who are interested in high-tech disciplines to carry out their studies in the United States.

UA

Nadia Mexia Alvares, director of the Office of collaborative initiatives with Latin America (OLAPI) of the UA said they are very fortunate to be so close to Mexico, because this way it is easier for them to encourage partnerships of the sort.

She also said that this agreement will help students study at a university with advanced technology, and that will help them to gain more opportunities in the future.

This agreement will expand the collaboration of the University of Arizona with higher education institutions in Mexico and in other countries. Plus it will support with research stays for students and promote cooperation for the creation and development of research projects.

The director of the OLAPI also explained that access to high-level education in Mexico has historically been reserved for those individuals who come from a higher socioeconomic level, and with this opportunity, they mean for education to be more accessible for anyone who wants and deserves it.

Mexico has recently experienced a strong influence of countries like Korea and Japan, who have recently arrived in the country with their businesses, creating new job opportunities, which has created the need to prepare future workers with the capacity to compete globally.

RELATED NEWS

  • Spain and Mexico’s Trade Relations Curdle over Manchego DisputeSpain and Mexico’s Trade Relations Curdle over Manchego Dispute
  • Cape Town Water crisis: Cape Town Water crisis: 'Day Zero' Draws Near
  • MORGAN STANLEY: Here are the 6 internet stocks to bet on in 2018MORGAN STANLEY: Here are the 6 internet stocks to bet on in 2018
  • Ford announces $11B investment, 40 electrified vehicles by 2022 at Detroit Motor ShowFord announces $11B investment, 40 electrified vehicles by 2022 at Detroit Motor Show
  • Automobile Revenues will fall 40% due to Electric and Autonomous VehiclesAutomobile Revenues will fall 40% due to Electric and Autonomous Vehicles
  • Mexico debuts its best startups for 2018 at CESMexico debuts its best startups for 2018 at CES
  • Inside the Secret Society Running the World of CryptocurrencyInside the Secret Society Running the World of Cryptocurrency
  • Opinion: Who Will Profit Off the Next Crash?Opinion: Who Will Profit Off the Next Crash?
  • This is how Jeff Bezos will support the This is how Jeff Bezos will support the 'dreamers'
  • Oil Reaches $70 a Barrel for First Time in Three YearsOil Reaches $70 a Barrel for First Time in Three Years
  • Peso predicted to make comeback in 2018: BloombergPeso predicted to make comeback in 2018: Bloomberg
  • Chihuahua´s governor denounces Government reprisals for PRI corruption investigationChihuahua´s governor denounces Government reprisals for PRI corruption investigation
WATCH LIVE TV



Most Read Articles
Most Watched Videos
  • Generations Riviera Maya
  • Mayair

Language

Mexico News Network
All rights Reserved 2018